Saturday, October 12, 2013

Check Your Tree's Stake. It May Be Time to Remove It.

Welcome to part 3 of this series on tree care tips to ensure your young trees get a healthy start to a long life. Although these tips are for anyone to follow, I encourage you to call upon your local tree service for assistance with your overall or general tree care. Many tree services are best left to professionals. While it is great to be a do-it-yourselfer, you don't want to jeopardize the health of your tree or waste the dollars already invested in the tree by making rookie mistakes. Today's topic is on loosening. 
Loosening refers to the staking of the tree. Check the stake. Is it too tight? Is it causing too much pressure from the tie. Keep in mind also that the tree stem should not rub against the stake or guard.
Perhaps the tree doesn't even still need to be staked. A young tree should only need one stake until the roots have grown well into the soil so that it gains stability. This process usually takes about a year. One way to tell it is time to remove the stake is to release the stake and see if the tree stays upright. If it does, it is time to remove the stake. If it doesn't keep the stake as is, but loosen it a bit so that it is not rubbing against the tree stem. When removing the stake, pay close attention to if the tree leans to one side or the other, or if the roots move, or if the top is heavy or bending. All these factors signify that the tree still needs to be staked. Also make sure that when you restake the tree, ensure that the tree stem stands upright. 
As always, if you have questions about your tree's care, contact your local tree service. As a Chicago tree service, they are well versed in all this and will give you the assistance you need. Those of you that are local to the Chicago area, Trees "R" Us, Inc. will help you with the care of your trees. In addition, their plant health care division has several Chicago certified arborists that are highly trained in caring for plants and trees. 
Stay tuned for my final post on the care of young tress that will cover clearing. If you want to read the previous posts on young tree care, click here
Thanks for following us!
Nick
Nick@treesrusinc.com

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