Friday, August 17, 2012

Laminated Root Rot or Yellow Ring Rot is Not What You Want to See


If your trees are infected with laminated root rot/yellow ring rot, then you are going to face a tough battle in trying to get rid of the fungus and save the tree.  Laminated root rot or Yellow Ring Rot is the most destructive root decay of Douglas firs in the N.W. Trees that have blown over and have roots that are decayed and stubbed off. On standing trees foliage in the crown will thin and turn yellow or chlorotic. An abnormally heavy crop of cones may be produced. Crown symptoms are usually not seen until at least half of the root system is affected.

The decayed wood separates readily (delaminates) at the annual rings with pitting evident in the wood. Reddish brown “whiskers” of the fungus known as setal hyphae may be found in infected tissue.

Life Cycle

The fungus is spread by root to root contact from one tree to another. The fungus does not grow through soil. It can survive up to 50 years in large roots and stumps of dead trees and infect other trees that come in contact with infected wood.

Management

 There is no chemical cure.
 Removal of infected stumps and roots.
 Removal of all symptomatic trees
 Replant with resistant species. All hardwood species are immune.
Laminated root rot can pose a serious hazard in developed areas due to risk of wind throw and resulting injury from falling trees. Affected trees should be removed as soon as possible.


Trees "R" Us, Inc. is a professional tree service in the Chicagoland area.  We service the north shore, north suburbs and northwest suburbs of Chicago.  Trees "R" Us, Inc. has 4 certified arborists on staff ready to assess your plants and tree care needs in a timely manner.  Our services include tree trimming, pruning, stump grinding, emergency tree services, tree removal, cabling and bracing, fertilization and plant health care.

Trees "R" Us, Inc. can be contacted at 847-913-9069 or through our online forms at www.treesrusinc.com.

Thanks for reading,
Nick

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